tibetan book of the dead jung commentary

Luminous Emptiness: A Guide to the Tibetan Book of the Dead Psychoanalyst C.G. Jung offers commentary on the differences between Eastern and Western. Tibetan Book of the Dead von Donald S. Lopez und eine große Auswahl von Carl Jung wrote a commentary on it, Timothy Leary redesigned it as a guidebook . Jung, C. G. „Psychological Commentary“, in W. Y. Evans-Wentz, ed., The Tibetan Book of the Dead. New York: Oxford University Press, (Dt.: „Geleitwort.

Evans-Wentz makes clear in his Introduction. As such, it forms a special chapter in the magical "cure of the soul" which extends even beyond death.

This cult of the dead is rationally based on the belief in the supra-temin the porality of the soul, but its irrational basis is to be found defor the do to need of the something living psychological.

This is an elementary need which forces the most "enlightened" individuals when faced by the death of relatives and friends.

That is why, enlightenment or no enwe still have all manner of ceremonies for the itself. Previous page Next page. The Tibetan Book of the Dead is one of the texts that, according to legend, Padma-Sambhava was compelled to hide during his visit to Tibet i The transformation of the unconscious that occurs under analysis makes it the natural analogue of the religious initiation ceremonies, which do, however, differ in principle from the natural process in that they forestall the natural course of development and substitute for the spontaneous production of symbols a deliberately selected set of symbols prescribed by tradition.

The real purpose of this singular seem very strange book to the educated the attempt, which must European of the twentieth is century, to enlighten the dead on their journey through the regions of the Bardo.

The Catholic Church is the only plac e in the world of the white man where any provision is made for the souls of the departed. Inside the Protestant camp, with its worldaffirming optimism, we only find a few mediumistic "rescue circles," whose main concern is to make the dead aware of the fact that they are dead.

As we have seen, Sidpa psychology consists in wanting to live and to be born. According to the teachings of the Bardo Thodol, it is still possible for him, in each of the Bardo states, to reach the Dharmakdya by transcending the four-faced Mount Meru, provided that he does not yield to his desire to follow the "dim lights.

What this means in practice is complete capitulation to the objective powers of the psyche, with all that this entails; a kind of symbolical death, corresponding to the Judgment of the Dead in the Sidpa Bardo.

Very often only a slight abaissement du niveau mental is needed to unleash this world of illusion. The terror and darkness of this moment has.

But the contents of this Bardo also reveal the archetypes, the karmic images which appear first in. The deliberately induced psychotic state, which in certain unstable individuals.

These things really are dangerous and ought not to be meddled with in our typically Western way. It is a meddling with fate, which strikes at the very roots of human existence and can let loose a flood of sufferings of which no sane person ever dreamed.

It is a sacrifice of the ego's stability and a sur-. When Freud coined the phrase that the ego was "the true seat of anxiety," he was giving voice to a very true and profound intuition.

Fear of self-sacrifice lurks. No one who strives for selfhood. This liberation is certainly a very necessary illusory and very heroic undertaking, but it represents nothing final: This, at first sight, would appear to be the world, which is swelled out with projections for that very purpose.

Here we seek and find our difficulties, here we seek and find our enemy, here we seek and find what is dear and precious to us; and it is comforting to know that all evil and all good is to be found out there, in the visible object, where it can be conquered, punished, destroyed, or enjoyed.

But nature herself does not allow this paradisal state of innocence to continue for ever. There are, and always have been, those who cannot help but see that the world and its experiences are in the nature of a symbol, and that it really effort,.

It is from this profound intuition, according to lamaist doctrine, that the Chonyid state derives its true meaning, which is why the Chonyid Bardo is.

The first to appear if we read the text backwards is the all-destroying God of Death, the epitome of all terrors; he is followed by the twenty-eight "power-holding" and sinister goddesses and the fifty-eight "blood-drinking" goddesses.

In spite of their demonic. It gradually becomes clearer that all these deities are organized into mandalas, or circles, containing a cross of the four colours.

The colours are co-. This takes us straight to the psychology of the lamaistic mandala, which I have already discussed in the book I brought out with the late Richard Wilhelm, The Secret of the Golden Flower.

Continuing our ascent backwards through the region of the Chdnyid Bardo, we come finally to the vision of the Four Great Ones: The ascent ends with the effulgent blue light of the Dharmadhatu, the Buddhabody, which glows in the midst of the mandala from the heart 1.

Thus reading backwards the Chikhai state, which appeared at the moment of death, is reached. The book describes a way of initiation in reverse, which, unlike the eschatological expectations of Christianity, prepares the soul for a descent into physical being.

The thoroughly intellectualistic and rationalistic worldly-mindedness of the European makes it advisable for us to reverse the of the Bardo Thodol and sequence to regard it as an account of Eastern initiation experiences,.

At any rate, the sequence of events as I have described it offers a close parallel to the phenomenology of the European unconscious when it is.

We can see this in the Exerdtia of Ignatius Loyola, or in the yoga meditations of the Buddhists and Tantrists. The reversal of the order of the chapters, which I have suggested here as an aid to understanding, in no way accords with the original intention of the Bardo ThodoL Nor is the psychological use we make of it anything but a secondary intention, though one that is possibly sanctioned by lamaist custom.

The Catholic Church is the only plac e in. Inside the Protestant camp, with its worldaffirming optimism, we only find a few mediumistic "rescue circles,".

But, generally speaking, we have in the West that is in any way comparable to the Bardo. According to tradition, the Bardo Thodol, too, seems to have been included among the "hidden" books, as Dr.

Evans-Wentz makes clear in his Introduction. As such, it forms a special chapter in the magical "cure of the soul" which extends even beyond death.

This cult of the dead is rationally based on the belief in the supra-temin the porality of the soul, but its irrational basis is to be found defor the do to need of the something living psychological.

This is an elementary need which forces the most "enlightened" individuals when faced by the death of relatives and friends.

That is why, enlightenment or no enwe still have all manner of ceremonies for the itself. If Lenin had to submit to being embalmed and put on in a sumptuous mausoleum like an Egyptian pharaoh, we may be quite sure it was not because his followers believed in.

Apart, however, from the Masses said for the soul in the Catholic Church, the provisions we make for the dead are rudimentary and on the lowest level, not be-.

We behave this need, and because we cannot believe in a life after death we cause. Simpler-minded people their own feelings, and, as in Italy, build themselves funeral monuments of gruesome beauty.

The Catholic Masses for the. But the highest application of spiritual effort on behalf of the departed is surely to be found in the instructions of the Bar do Thodol.

Even if the truth should prove to be a disappointment, one. The supreme vision comes not at the end of the Bardo, but right at the beginning,.

The spiritual climax is reached at the moment when life ends. Human life, the vehicle of the highest perfection it is possible alone generates the karma that makes it possible for the dead man to abide in the perpetual light of the Voidness without clinging to any object, and thus to rest on the hub of therefore,.

Life in the Bardo brings no eternal rewards or punishments, but merely a descent into a new life which shall bear the individual nearer to his final goal.

But this eschatological goal is what he last and highest fruit of the labours of existence. This view is not only lofty, earthly aspirations manly and heroic.

The degenerative character of Bardo life is corroborated by the spiritualistic literature of the West, which again and again gives one a sickening impression of the utter inanity and banalcommunications from the "spirit world.

And it is an undeniable fact that the whole book is cre-. Behind these there lie and in this our Western reason is quite right-. Now whether a thing is "given" subjectively or objectively, the fact remains that.

Dhyani-Buddhas are themselves no more than psychic data. That is just what the dead man has to recognize, if it has not already self.

To turn this sentence round so that it reads. For it is a book that will only open itself to which no man is spiritual understanding, and this is a capacity.

It is good that such to all intents and purposes "useless" books exist. They are meant for those "queer folk" who no longer set much store by the uses, aims, and meaning of present-day "civilization.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead is one of the texts that, according to legend, Padma-Sambhava was compelled to hide during his visit to Tibet i The Tibetan Book Bardo Thodol, is a book of instrucdead and dying.

The text falls into three parts. The first part, called Chikhai Bardo , describes the psychic happenings at the moment of death.

It is characteristic that and hence the: EAST supreme insight and illumination, greatest possibility of attaining liberation, are vouchsafed during the actual process of dying.

Soon afterward, the "illusions" begin which lead eventually to reincarnation, the illuminative lights growing ever fainter and more multifarious, and the illustrates the truth as it visions more and more This descent from the liberating terrifying.

The purpose of the instruction is dead and entanglement, on and to explain to him the Bar do Thodol is re- to fix the attention of the at each successive stage of delusion the ever-present possibility of liberation, man, the nature of his visions.

I am sure that all who read this book with open eyes, and who allow it to impress itself upon them without prejudice, will reap a rich I reward.

It belongs to that class of writings which are not only of interest to specialists in Mahayana Buddhism, but which also, because of their deep humanity and their still deeper The Bardo Thodol, insight into the secrets of the appeal to the layman who is human psyche, seeking to make an broaden especial his knowledge of life.

Unlike the Egyptian Book of the Dead, which always prompts one to say too much or too little, the Bardo Thodol offers one an intelligible philosophy addressed to human beings rather than to gods or primitive savages.

Not only the "wrathful" but also the "peaceful" deities are conceived as samsaric projections of the psyche, an idea that seems all too obvious to the human enlightened banal simplifica- European, because it reminds him of his own But though the European can easily explain away these deities as projections, he would be quite incapable of positing them at the same time as real.

The background of this unusual book is not the niggardly European "either-or," but a magnificently affirmative "both-and. The Bardo Thodol is in the highest degree psychological in its outlook; but, with us, philosophy and theology are still in the medieval, pre-psychological stage where only the assertions are listened to, explained, defended, criticized and disputed, while the authority that makes them has, by general consent, been deposed as outside the scope of discussion.

To the Western mind, which compensates its well-known feelings of resentment by a psyche, slavish regard for "rational" explanations, this obvious truth all too obvious, or else it is seen as an inadmissible negation of metaphysical "truth.

EAST something pitifully small, besides. He thereunworthy, personal, subjective, and a lot more fore prefers to use the word "mind" instead, though he likes to at the same time that a statement which may in fact be pretend the very subjective indeed is made by the "mind," naturally by "Universal Mind," or even-at a pinch-by the "Absolute" itself.

It almost seems as if for the regrettable Anatole France had uttered a truth which were valid for the whole Western world when, in his Penguin Island, Catherine d'Alexandrie offers this advice to God: Such knowledge, templatives who granted to many are to minded be to: EAST sure, is suitable only for conunderstand the purpose of ex- and thereistence, for those who are Gnostics by temperament fore believe in a saviour who, like the saviour of the Mandaeans, it is not is called "knowledge of life" Manda d'Hayye.

And, in point of nature of the psyche. Such was the case, at least, with all the mystery cults in ancient civili- from the time of the Egyptian and Eleusinian mysteries.

In the initiation of the living, however, this "Beyond" is not a world beyond death, but a reversal of the mind's intentions and zations outlook, a psychological "Beyond" or, in Christian terms, a sin.

Re"redemption" from the trammels of the world and of condian earlier from deliverance and demption is a separation a condition to and leads and tion of darkness unconsciousness, of illumination and releasedness, to victory and transcendence over everything "given.

Evans- Wentz also feels, purpose it is to restore to the soul Now it is a characteristic of Oriental the religious literature that the teaching invariably begins with most important item, with the ultimate and highest principles which, with us, would come last as for instance in Apuleius, is worshipped as Helios only right at the end.

Originally, this therapy took the form of Freudian psychoanalysis and was mainly con- cerned with sexual fantasies. This is the realm that corresponds and lowest region of the Bardo, known as the Sidpa Bardo, where the dead man, unable to profit by the teachings of the Chikhai and Chonyid Bardo, begins to fall a prey to sexual fantasies and is attracted by the vision of mating couples.

Eventually he is caught by a womb and born into the earthly to the last world again. Meanwhile, plex as a as one might expect, the Oedipus comkarma destines him to be reborn starts functioning.

If his man, he will fall in love with his mother-to-be and will find and disgusting. Conversely, the future daughter will be highly attracted by her father-to-be and repelled by his father hateful her mother.

It has even been suggested in psychoanalytical circles that the trauma par excellence is the birth-experience it- selfnay more, psychoanalysts even claim to have probed back to memories of mtra-uterine origin.

But, had the journey back been consistently pursued, it would undoubt- back. EAST intra-uterine experigot beyond purely conjectural traces of ences, and even the famous 'birth trauma" has remained such an obvious truism that it can no longer explain anything, any ' the hypothesis that life is a disease with a bad its outcome is always fatal.

Freudian psychoanalysis, in all essential aspects, never went beyond the experiences of the Sidpa Bar do; that is, it was unable to extricate itself from sexual fantasies and similar "incompati- more than can prognosis because ble" tendencies which cause anxiety and other affective states.

That is to say, anyone who penetrates into the unconscious with purely biological assumptions will become stuck in the instinctual sphere and be unable to advance beyond it, for he will be pulled back again and again into physical existence.

But, as even Max Scheler noted with regret, the power of this "mind" is, to say the least of it, doubtful. Psychic heredity does exist that is to say, there is inheritance of psychic characteristics such as predisposition to disease, traits of char- would be r acter, special gifts, and so forth.

It does no violence facts if natural science to the reduces psychic nature of these complex them to what appear to be physical aspects nuclear structures in cells, and so on.

These are the universal and they are to be understood as dispositions of the mind, with which forms Plato's to eidola , in accordance analogous the mind organizes its contents.

EAST always and everywhere present as the basic postulates of reason. As the products of imagination are always in essence visual, their forms must, from the outset, have the character of images and moreover of typical images, which is why, following St.

Augustine, I call them "archetypes. The astonishing parallelism between these images and the ideas they serve to express has frequently given rise to the wildest migration theories, although it would have been far more natural to think of the remarkable similarity human times and in all places.

The original structural components of the psyche are of no less surprising a uniformity than are those of of the psyche at fantasy-forms are, in all fact, the visible body.

If the archetypes were not pre-existent in identical form everywhere, how could one explain the fact, postulated at almost every turn by the Bardo Thodol, that the dead do not know that they are dead, and that this assertion is to be met with just as often in the dreary, half-baked literature of European and American Spiritualism?

I must content myself with the hypothesis of an omnipresent, ficant, too, that ghosts all in common. For, just as the organs of the body are not mere lumps of indifferent, passive matter, but are dynamic, functional complexes which assert themselves with imperious urgency, so also the archetypes, as organs of the psyche, are dynamic, instinctual complexes which determine psychic life to an extraordinary degree.

It means the end conduct of life, of all conscious, rational, morally responsible and a voluntary surrender to what the Bardo "kannic illusion. EAST first sight what is the difference between fantasies of kind and the phantasmagoria of a lunatic.

The terror and darkness of this moment has see at this its the opening equivalent in the experiences described in sec- tions of the Sidpa Bardo.

But the contents of this Bardo also reveal the archetypes, the karmic images which appear first in their terrifying form.

The Chonyid state is equivalent to a deliberately induced psychosis. The deliberately induced psychotic state, which in certain unstable individuals might easily lead to a real psychosis, is a danger that needs to be taken very seriously indeed.

These sufferings correspond to the hellish torments of the Chonyid state, described in the text as follows: Then the Lord of Death will place round thy neck a rope and drag thee along; he will cut off thy head, tear out thy heart, pull out thy intestines, lick up thy brain, drink thy blood, eat thy flesh, and gnaw thy bones; but thou wilt be incapable of dying.

Even when thy body is hacked to pieces, it will revive again. The repeated hack- ing will cause intense These tortures aptly describe the real nature of the danger: The psychological psychic dissociation.

commentary tibetan jung book the dead of -

Still more useful supplementary material will be found in the book's introductory remarks, by its editor Evans-Wentz and by the eminent psychoanalyst C. Rethinking Politics and Modernity--A Reader. Es gibt noch keine Rezensionen. Seite 1 von 1 Zum Askgamblers igt Seite 1 von 1. Das Verweilen in den drei Zwischenzuständen vom Eintreten des Todes bis zur Wiedergeburt wird in den Schriften auf maximal 49 Tage angesetzt. Zukünftige Studien müss- ten sich vermehrt der Frage widmen, inwiefern auch rituelle Angebote innerhalb westlicher Gemeinschaf- ten vorhanden sind und genutzt werden. Vor diesem Hintergrund lassen sich auch die Transformati- ons- und Adaptionsprozesse tibetisch-buddhistischer Vorstellungen und Praktiken zu Sterben und Tod in Form des sogenannten Tibetischen Totenbuches deuten. Beschreibung Autoren Über den Autor Leseproben Fachgebiete The Tibetan Book of the Dead is the most famous Buddhist text in the West, having sold more than a million copies since it was first published in English in Um Ihnen ein besseres Nutzererlebnis zu bieten, verwenden wir Cookies. Alle Anhaftungen an das vorherige Leben wurden von dem Lama als Folgen schlechter Taten in vergan- genen Existenzen gedeutet. Es gelten unsere Allgemeinen Casino stream hd The book shows many of the major themes running throughout the writings, including the relativity of space and time surrounding death, the link between transference and death, and the archetypes shared among the world's religions at the depths of the Self. Still more useful supplementary wann fand die erste europameisterschaft statt? Im gesamten Text lässt sich eine Tendenz zur Universalisierung der tibetisch- buddhistischen Lehren und Praktiken ausmachen. The William hill free casino games Thodol, fitly named by its editor, Dr. Kontakt Wir helfen Ihnen gerne und schnell bei Ihren Fragen weiter. Land bis 1 kg bis 2 kg bis 5 kg EU ca. Tibetan Buddhism and the West". The New Voices of Islam: A too-hasty return to game involvements will blur the clarity and reduce the potential for learning. Individual advanced in meditation: Jahrhundert wurden die vielfältigen Vorstellungen über die Bardos systematisiert und zu einem liturgischen und rituellen System ausgebaut Cuevas Im Kontext seiner Feldstudie konnte er die Sterbe- Bestattungs- und Totenri- tuale für die jährige Tochter des Dorfvorstehers beobachten. Preparation Psychedelic chemicals are not drugs in the usual sense of the word. Eine empirische Studie im Raum Berlin. When the guide acts to protect himself, he communicates his concern. Das Tibetanische Totenbuch für Hughes auch in einer weiteren Hinsicht: The Tibetan Book of the Dead, to whichJung referred in his psychological commentary. A profile of a community-based Casino in deutschland eroffnen hospice. Bevor jedoch der Herr des Todes, gemessen an den karmisch wirksamen Taten, über die nächste Wiedergeburt entscheide, sei der Verstorbenen ein Aufschub von 49 Tagen gewährt. In der Studie unter- sucht Mumford das ambivalente Zusammenspiel zweier konkurrierender religiöser Tra- ditionen im Aufeinandertreffen buddhistischer Lamas und nepalesischer Gurung Sha- manen. It's more than worth its price Beste Spielothek in Bergfeld finden the small bit of text on those 38 pages. There are no familiar fixed landmarks, no place to put your foot, no solid concept upon which to base your thinking. How the Swans came to the Lake. Aus einer funktionalistischen Perspektive heraus betrachtet, erfüllt die Rezitation der Bardo Thödol -Texte in Rahmen der geschilderten Totenrituale verschiedene Zwecke. Seine Aus- führungen in der Einleitung und dem Kommentarapparat zur Übersetzung des tibeti- schen Textes erhielten damit das Siegel der Autorität des Eingeweihten.

commentary tibetan jung book the dead of -

Jede weitere Auflage enthielt zusätzliche Kommentare, Vorworte und Einleitun- gen, die zum Teil mehr Raum einnahmen als der eigentliche Text. Zu diesen Umständen zählte die Aufgabe der Familie, die Anfertigung einer Buddhastatue oder eines Thangkas zu ver- anlassen. Einzelne Kapitel enthalten Anleitungen zu konkreten Prak- tiken, die der Leser in seinen Alltag integrieren soll oder die in bestimmten Situationen als hilfreich erachtet werden. Avoid imposing the ego game on the experience. Das Beispiel darf jedoch nicht darüber hinwegtäuschen, dass nur ein geringer Prozentsatz von Patienten palliativer Einrichtungen praktizierende tibetische Buddhis- ten sind. The Faces of Buddhism in America. In Gangtok beauftragte Evans-Wentz den sikkimesischen Lehrer Kazi Dawa-Samdup , der bereits mit anderen Orientalisten und Tibetreisenden zusammengear- beitet hatte Fields Dalai Lama als Herausgeber tätig. Einzelbezug Wir beliefern Sie nur mit dem ausgewählten Produkt. He died quietly in his own bed, surrounded by friends, and on Feb 9 , a portion of Leary's cremated remains were launched into space.

Tibetan Book Of The Dead Jung Commentary Video

Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead History Channel Documentary medium One remains in this world for forty-nine days and then reenters the womb and is born again. For years, ever since it was first published, the Bardo Thodol has been my constant companion, and to it I owe not only many stimulating ideas and Beste Spielothek in Gössen finden, but also many fundamental insights. The bar do thos grol is known in the west as The Tibetan Book of Beste Spielothek in Ostheim finden Deada title popularized by Walter Evans-Wentz 's edition, [9] [10] but as such virtually unknown in Tibet. Fear of self-sacrifice lurks deep in every ego, and this Free Video Slots Online | Play Casino Video Slots for Fun | 17 is often only the precariously controlled demand of the unconscious forces to burst out book full strength. Continuing our ascent backwards through the region of the Chdnyid Bardo, we come finally to the vision of the Four Great Ones: It is a "nothing but. Its philosophy contains the quintessence of Buddhist psychological criticism; and, as such. On the surface it is an instruction manual for the Living on what to whisper into the ear of someone who has just died. If we choose the tibetan book of the dead jung commentary womb entrance we might be reincarnated as an animal, an anguished spirit or a hell-being. This Tibetan Buddhist sect holds that the purpose of existence liabilities deutsch to escape life on this plane. They only emerge into consciousness when personal experiences have rendered them visible. At this stage we will be presented with various visions of future places of rebirth. Most people, not having prepared themselves for this moment of death, lose consciousness [5] at this point and thereby fail to recognize the Clear Light. And it is an slots luftverkehr fact that the whole book is cre.

Tibetan book of the dead jung commentary -

I just recently began reading it and it is very helpful in understanding our life process. The authors also make an important contribution to the interpretation of The Tibetan Book of the Dead. The Bon Religion of Tibet. Moderate and Radical Islamic Fundamentalism: Methods and Findings in Recent Scholarship.

Thine own consciousness, shining, void, and inseparable from the Great Body of Radiance, hath no birth, nor death, and is the Immutable Light Buddha Amitabha.

The soul is assuredly not small, but the radiant Godhead itThe West finds this statement either very dangerous, if not. Somehow we always have a wrong attitude to these things.

But if we can master ourselves far enough to refrain from our chief error of always wanting to do something with things and put them to practical use, we may perhaps succeed in learning an important lesson from these teachings, or at least in appreciating the greatness of the.

No sun is thereby eclipsed for the Oriental as it would be for the Christian, who would feel robbed of his God; on the contrary, his soul is the light of the Godhead, and the Godhead is the soul.

The East can sustain this paradox better than the unfortunate Angelus Silesius, who even today psychologically far in advance of his time.

This is a truth which in the face of all evidence, in the greatest things as in the smallest, is never known, although it is often so very necessary, indeed vital, for us to.

Perhaps of us to see the world as something "given. It is so much more straightforward, more dramatic, impressive, and therefore more convincing, to see all the things that happen to me than to observe how I make them happen.

Indeed, the animal nature of man makes him resist seeing himself as the maker of his circumstances. That is why attempts of this kind were always the object of secret initiations, culminating as a rule in a figurative death which symbolized the total character of this reversal.

And, in point of. Such was the case, at least, with all the mystery cults in ancient civili-. In the initiation of the living, however, this "Beyond" is not a world beyond death, but a reversal of the mind's intentions and.

Re"redemption" from the trammels of the world and of condian earlier from deliverance and demption is a separation a condition to and leads and tion of darkness unconsciousness, of illumination and releasedness, to victory and transcendence This penetration into the groundlayers of consciousness is a kind of rational maieutics in the Socratic sense, a bringing forth of psychic contents that are still germinal, subliminal, and as yet unborn.

Originally, this therapy took the form of Freudian psychoanalysis and was mainly con-. Eventually he is caught by a womb and born into the earthly to the last.

Conversely, the future daughter will be highly attracted by her father-to-be and repelled by. The European passes through this specifically Freudian domain when his unconscious contents are brought to light under analysis, but he goes in the reverse direction.

He journeys back through the world of infantile-sexual fantasy to the womb. It has even been suggested in psychoanalytical circles that the.

Here Western reason reaches its limit, unfortunately. It is true that, with the equipment of our existing biological ideas, such a venture would not have been crowned with success; it would have needed a wholly different kind of philosophical preparation from that based on current scientific assumptions.

But, had the journey back been consistently pursued, it would undoubt-. Bardo life, if only it had been possible to find at least some trace of an experiencing subject.

Freudian psychoanalysis, in all essential aspects, never went beyond the experiences of the Sidpa Bar do; that is, it was unable to extricate itself from sexual fantasies and similar "incompati-.

That is to say, anyone who penetrates into the unconscious with purely biological assumptions will become stuck in the instinctual sphere and be unable to advance beyond it, for he will be pulled back.

It is therefore not possible for Freudian theory to reach anything except an essentially negative valuation of the unconscious.

It is a "nothing but. As to what "mind" means in this connection, we can only cherish the 2 hope that it will carry conviction.

But, as even Max Scheler noted with regret, the power of this "mind" is, to say the least. Even so, this advance has been a great gain, inasmuch as it has enabled us to take one more step behind our conscious lives.

This knowledge also gives us a hint of how we. If, with the help of our Western science, we have to some extent succeeded in understanding the psychological character of the Sidpa Bardo, our next task is to see if we can make anything of the preceding Chonyid Bardo.

The Chonyid state is one of karmic illusion that is to say, illusions which result from the psychic residua of previous According to the Eastern view, karma implies a on the hypothesis of an hypothesis of the scientific knowledge of our Neither the soul.

There are too many if s and but's. Above all, we know desperately little about the possibilities of continued existence of the individual soul after death, so little that we cannot even conceive how anyone could prove anything at all in this respect.

Moreover, we know existences. Psychic heredity does exist that is to say, there is inheritance of psychic characteristics such as predisposition to disease, traits of char-.

They are essential phenomena of life which as there are express themselves, in the main, psychically, just in which themselves, characteristics other inherited express these level.

These are the universal. Only, in the case of our "forms," we are not dealing with categories of reason but with categories of the imagination.

The astonishing parallelism between these images and the ideas they serve to express has frequently given rise to the wildest migration theories, although it would have been far more natural to think of the remarkable similarity.

Archetypal reproduced spontaneously anytime and anywhere, without there being any conceivable trace of direct transmission.

The original structural components of the psyche are of no less surprising a uniformity than are those of. The archetypes are, so to speak, organs of the pre-rational psyche.

They are eternally inherited forms and ideas which have at first no specific content. Their specific content only appears in the course of the individual's life, when personal experience is taken up in precisely these forms.

If the archetypes were not pre-existent in identical form everywhere, how could one explain the fact, postulated at almost every turn. Although we find the same assertion in Swedenborg, knowledge of his writings can hardly be sufficiently widespread for this little bit of information to have been picked up by every small-town medium.

And a connection between Swedenborg and the Bardo Thodol is completely unthinkable. It is a primordial, universal idea that the dead simply continue their earthly existence and do not know that they are disembodied spirits an archetypal idea which enters into immediate, visible manifestation whenever anyone sees a ghost.

It is signiover the world have certain features naturally aware of the unverifiable spiritualistic hypothesis, though I have no wish to make it my own.

I must content myself with the hypothesis of an omnipresent, ficant, too, that ghosts all. For, just as the organs of the body are not mere lumps of indifferent, passive matter, but are dynamic, functional complexes which assert themselves with imperious urgency, so also the archetypes, as organs of the psyche, are.

That is why I also call them dominants of the unconscious. So far as I know, there is no inheritance of individual prenatal, or pre-uterine, memories, but there are undoubtedly inherited archetypes which are, however, devoid of content, because, to begin with, they contain no personal experiences.

They only emerge into consciousness when personal experiences have rendered them visible. As we have seen, Sidpa psychology consists in wanting to live and to be born.

According to the teachings of the Bardo Thodol, it is still possible for him, in each of the Bardo states, to reach the Dharmakdya by transcending the four-faced Mount Meru, provided that he does not yield to his desire to follow the "dim lights.

What this means in practice is complete capitulation to the objective powers of the psyche, with all that this entails; a kind of symbolical death, corresponding to the Judgment of the Dead in the Sidpa Bardo.

Very often only a slight abaissement du niveau mental is needed to unleash this world of illusion. The terror and darkness of this moment has.

But the contents of this Bardo also reveal the archetypes, the karmic images which appear first in. The deliberately induced psychotic state, which in certain unstable individuals.

These things really are dangerous and ought not to be meddled with in our typically Western way. It is a meddling with fate, which strikes at the very roots of human existence and can let loose a flood of sufferings of which no sane person ever dreamed.

It is a sacrifice of the ego's stability and a sur-. When Freud coined the phrase that the ego was "the true seat of anxiety," he was giving voice to a very true and profound intuition.

Fear of self-sacrifice lurks. No one who strives for selfhood. This liberation is certainly a very necessary illusory and very heroic undertaking, but it represents nothing final: This, at first sight, would appear to be the world, which is swelled out with projections for that very purpose.

Here we seek and find our difficulties, here we seek and find our enemy, here we seek and find what is dear and precious to us; and it is comforting to know that all evil and all good is to be found out there, in the visible object, where it can be conquered, punished, destroyed, or enjoyed.

But nature herself does not allow this paradisal state of innocence to continue for ever. There are, and always have been, those who cannot help but see that the world and its experiences are in the nature of a symbol, and that it really effort,.

It is from this profound intuition, according to lamaist doctrine, that the Chonyid state derives its true meaning, which is why the Chonyid Bardo is.

The first to appear if we read the text backwards is the all-destroying God of Death, the epitome of all terrors; he is followed by the twenty-eight "power-holding" and sinister goddesses and the fifty-eight "blood-drinking" goddesses.

In spite of their demonic. It gradually becomes clearer that all these deities are organized into mandalas, or circles, containing a cross of the four colours.

The colours are co-. This takes us straight to the psychology of the lamaistic mandala, which I have already discussed in the book I brought out with the late Richard Wilhelm, The Secret of the Golden Flower.

Continuing our ascent backwards through the region of the Chdnyid Bardo, we come finally to the vision of the Four Great Ones: The ascent ends with the effulgent blue light of the Dharmadhatu, the Buddhabody, which glows in the midst of the mandala from the heart 1.

Thus reading backwards the Chikhai state, which appeared at the moment of death, is reached. The book describes a way of initiation in reverse, which, unlike the eschatological expectations of Christianity, prepares the soul for a descent into physical being.

The thoroughly intellectualistic and rationalistic worldly-mindedness of the European makes it advisable for us to reverse the of the Bardo Thodol and sequence to regard it as an account of Eastern initiation experiences,.

At any rate, the sequence of events as I have described it offers a close parallel to the phenomenology of the European unconscious when it is.

We can see this in the Exerdtia of Ignatius Loyola, or in the yoga meditations of the Buddhists and Tantrists. The reversal of the order of the chapters, which I have suggested here as an aid to understanding, in no way accords with the original intention of the Bardo ThodoL Nor is the psychological use we make of it anything but a secondary intention, though one that is possibly sanctioned by lamaist custom.

The Catholic Church is the only plac e in. Inside the Protestant camp, with its worldaffirming optimism, we only find a few mediumistic "rescue circles,".

But, generally speaking, we have in the West that is in any way comparable to the Bardo. According to tradition, the Bardo Thodol, too, seems to have been included among the "hidden" books, as Dr.

Evans-Wentz makes clear in his Introduction. As such, it forms a special chapter in the magical "cure of the soul" which extends even beyond death.

This cult of the dead is rationally based on the belief in the supra-temin the porality of the soul, but its irrational basis is to be found defor the do to need of the something living psychological.

This is an elementary need which forces the most "enlightened" individuals when faced by the death of relatives and friends. That is why, enlightenment or no enwe still have all manner of ceremonies for the itself.

If Lenin had to submit to being embalmed and put on in a sumptuous mausoleum like an Egyptian pharaoh, we may be quite sure it was not because his followers believed in.

Apart, however, from the Masses said for the soul in the Catholic Church, the provisions we make for the dead are rudimentary and on the lowest level, not be-.

We behave this need, and because we cannot believe in a life after death we cause. Simpler-minded people their own feelings, and, as in Italy, build themselves funeral monuments of gruesome beauty.

The Catholic Masses for the. But the highest application of spiritual effort on behalf of the departed is surely to be found in the instructions of the Bar do Thodol.

Even if the truth should prove to be a disappointment, one. The supreme vision comes not at the end of the Bardo, but right at the beginning,. The spiritual climax is reached at the moment when life ends.

Human life, the vehicle of the highest perfection it is possible alone generates the karma that makes it possible for the dead man to abide in the perpetual light of the Voidness without clinging to any object, and thus to rest on the hub of therefore,.

Life in the Bardo brings no eternal rewards or punishments, but merely a descent into a new life which shall bear the individual nearer to his final goal.

But this eschatological goal is what he last and highest fruit of the labours of existence. This view is not only lofty, earthly aspirations manly and heroic.

The degenerative character of Bardo life is corroborated by the spiritualistic literature of the West, which again and again gives one a sickening impression of the utter inanity and banalcommunications from the "spirit world.

And it is an undeniable fact that the whole book is cre-. Behind these there lie and in this our Western reason is quite right-.

Now whether a thing is "given" subjectively or objectively, the fact remains that. Dhyani-Buddhas are themselves no more than psychic data.

That is just what the dead man has to recognize, if it has not already self. To turn this sentence round so that it reads. For it is a book that will only open itself to which no man is spiritual understanding, and this is a capacity.

It is good that such to all intents and purposes "useless" books exist. They are meant for those "queer folk" who no longer set much store by the uses, aims, and meaning of present-day "civilization.

Indeed, one can consider any momentary state of consciousness a bardo, since it lies between our past and future existences; it provides us with the opportunity to experience reality, which is always present but obscured by the projections and confusions that are due to our previous unskillful actions.

The bar do thos grol is known in the west as The Tibetan Book of the Dead , a title popularized by Walter Evans-Wentz 's edition, [9] [10] but as such virtually unknown in Tibet.

Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead. Indeed, he warns repeatedly of the dangers for western man in the wholesale adoption of eastern religious traditions such as yoga.

They construed the effect of LSD as a "stripping away" of ego-defenses, finding parallels between the stages of death and rebirth in the Tibetan Book of the Dead , and the stages of psychological "death" and "rebirth" which Leary had identified during his research.

Symbolically he must die to his past, and to his old ego, before he can take his place in the new spiritual life into which he has been initiated.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. History Timeline Outline Culture Index of articles. What happens when we die? Interviews with Tibetan Lamas, American scholars, and practicing Buddhists bring this powerful and mysterious text to life.

State-of-the-art computer generated graphics will recreabinte this mysterious and exotic world. Follow the dramatized journey of a soul from death In Tibet, the "art of dying" is nothing less than the art of living.

The New York Times. Oxford University Press, The Collected Works of C. Reynolds, John Myrdin , "Appendix I: The views on Dzogchen of W. Archived from the original on 16 September Retrieved from " https:

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